Flame sign above former gas building temporarily coming down

The iconic flame sign that has perched atop the former Lone Star Gas Building since 1957 is temporarily coming down. Efforts are underway to identify funding to restore and reinstall it.

Due to recent storms, the sign has become structurally unsound and will be removed and stored at a city facility until additional funding for restoration can be identified. Once restored, the sign may be considered by the City Council for inclusion in the Fort Worth Public Art collection, allowing it to be properly maintained as a cultural icon.

An emergency certificate of appropriateness for removing the sign has been issued by the Historic and Cultural Landmarks Commission. The sign will be labeled and photographed before storage. Original drawings of the sign are filed with the city’s Planning & Development Department and Facilities Management Department.

The restoration will cost approximately $120,000. Atmos Energy has pledged $60,000 toward the restoration.

About the building

The former Lone Star Gas Co. headquarters, 908 Monroe St., was designed by Fort Worth architect Wyatt C. Hedrick in 1929 as a four-story building that could be expanded with three additional floors. Those three floors were added to the top of the building in 1957; they were also designed by Hedrick.

That same year, the blue flame neon sign of the Lone Star Gas logo was installed atop the building. The enamel-painted rotating sign featured neon lighting. The sign was designed, constructed and installed by Federal Electric Sign Co., now called Federal Heath Sign Co.

The building features Art Deco styling and has a beautiful lobby that has been restored. The Fort Worth Water Department and other city offices currently occupy the building. The building is designated a historic and cultural landmark and includes the Lone Star Gas sign as an essential element.

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