TCC Southeast Chef Wins Top State Pastry Honor

Hodges, right, and Warner display Hodges awards.

Alison Hodges (right) celebrates with Katrina Warner, coordinator of TCC’s Culinary Arts program.

FORT WORTH, Texas (Aug.10, 2017) – Alison Hodges, Tarrant County College Southeast culinary instructor, recently was named state Pastry Chef of the Year at the Texas Chefs Association state convention in Corpus Christi. Hodges was selected from eligible honorees from the 12 Texas chapters and was honored at the President’s dinner.
 
Hodges began her culinary career at the Hyatt Regency as an apprentice in the Dallas Chapter of American Culinary Federation in January 1990. In 1992, she was named the chapter’s Apprentice of the Year. That same year, Hodges earned an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree in Food and Hospitality Services from Dallas County Community College’s El Centro College. She has since earned her AAS in Culinary Arts and her AAS in Bakery and Pastry, also from El Centro.
 
After completing her apprenticeship, she remained at the Hyatt for another seven years, where she specialized in pastries. Hodges said she was drawn to pastry work because of its “artistry and craftsmanship.”
 
“I enjoy detail work,” she said, adding, “Also, I simply like the way sweets taste!”
 
Hodges took a purchasing job at a catering and vending company in 2000 because she started to develop carpel tunnel syndrome in her wrists. She soon realized she missed the art of pastry, so when she was offered an adjunct teaching position at her alma mater, El Centro College, she took it. She joined TCC’s Culinary Arts program as a member of the adjunct faculty in 2006, teaching both the Fundamentals of Baking and the Advanced Pastry classes.
 
In the spring 2014, she became full time faculty at TCC Southeast and began teaching the Dual Credit Purchasing and Dining Room classes. Additionally, she has taught cake decorating as part of Community & Industry Education curriculum at TCC’s South Campus.
 
Hodges has been an active member of both the ACF and the Texas Chefs Association (TCA) since 1990. She has competed in numerous ACF-sanctioned competitions and won a number of medals — four gold, one silver and one bronze, as well as several medals through the TCA. Hodges joined the World Master Chefs Association in 1996 and participated on that year’s Golden Platter Banqueting Competition team as a member of its pastry team that brought home the Golden Platter from Limerick, Ireland.
 
Watch this video to learn more about TCC’s Culinary Arts Program.
 

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Carroll ISD Taking Nominations for Athletic Hall of Honor

The Carroll ISD Athletic Department is asking for nominees for the Athletic Hall of Honor to celebrate excellence and salute the contributions of individuals whose advancement of athletics in Carroll ISD and beyond has made a profound difference in the lives of young people and the community.

Each year, nominations will be taken and five members will be selected to the Athletic Hall of Honor by a Hall of Honor committee. Once nominated, an individual will stay on the nomination list. Nominees can be coaches, teachers, administrators, athletes, fans, or booster club members who have contributed significantly to Carroll ISD athletics programs. Once nominated, individuals remain indefinitely on the nomination list for future consideration.

Nomination forms can be found online here or by contacting the CISD Athletic Department at 817-949-8300. Nominations for the class of 2017 will be due to the CISD Athletic Office by August 14, 2017. The inductees will be announced August 25, 2017. They will be honored at the homecoming parade October 11, 2017, and introduced at the homecoming game on October 13, 2017.

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Dawson Middle School Wind Ensemble Takes 5th in State Honor Band Contest

The DMS Wind Ensemble, made up of 54 Dawson Middle School students, has been working hard over their summer break, bringing home 5th place from the State Honor Band Contest.

The Honor Band selection process occurred throughout the summer, with over 80 2C middle school bands from across the state entering the contest through their respective region. The DMS band participated in the Region 31 listening on June 7, and advanced to the Area level listening on June 23 in Abilene. Dawson placed first at both the Region and Area levels, and advanced to the State level, which took place on July 20. Out of the 16 state finalists, the DMS Wind Ensemble placed 5th.

As part of the TMEA Honor Band process, middle schools were required to submit three selections including one march, from recordings of competitive, concert or festival performances in the current year. A maximum of four performances scheduled for recordings was allowed. Three of the performances could be non-competitive; the fourth had to come from the UIL Concert Contest.

The Wind Ensemble also received superior ratings from all judges at UIL Concert and Sighreading, named “Best in Class” for the 2C Invitational Classification of the Beach Within Reach Festival, and was named “Best in Class” and ” Most Outstanding Middle School Band” at the Peak Music Festival.

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TCC Southeast Chef Wins Top Pastry Honor

Alison Hodges FORT WORTH, Texas (July 13, 2017) – Alison Hodges, Tarrant County College Southeast culinary instructor, recently won Pastry Chef of the Year at the Texas Chefs Association meeting in Dallas. Hodges, a contender for the state recognition, will receive her plaque at the association’s August convention in Corpus Christi.
 
Hodges began her culinary career at the Hyatt Regency as an apprentice in the Dallas Chapter of American Culinary Federation in January 1990. In 1992, she was named the chapter’s Apprentice of the Year. That same year, Hodges earned an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree in Food and Hospitality Services from Dallas County Community College’s El Centro College. She has since earned her AAS in Culinary Arts and her AAS in Bakery and Pastry, also from El Centro.
 
Alison Hodges decorates cakeAfter completing her apprenticeship, she remained at the Hyatt for another seven years where she specialized in pastries. Hodges said she was drawn to pastry work because of its “artistry and craftsmanship.”
 
“I enjoy detail work,” she said, adding, “Also, I simply like the way sweets taste!”
 
Hodges took a purchasing job at a catering and vending company in 2000 because she started to develop carpel tunnel in her wrists. She soon realized she missed the art of pastry, so when she was offered an adjunct teaching position at her alma mater, El Centro College, she took it. She joined TCC’s Culinary Arts program as a member of the adjunct faculty in 2006, teaching both the Fundamentals of Baking and the Advanced Pastry classes.
 
In the spring 2014, she became full time faculty at TCC Southeast and began teaching the Dual Credit Purchasing and Dining Room classes. Additionally, she has taught cake decorating as part of Community & Industry Education curriculum at TCC’s South Campus.
 
Hodges has been an active member of both the ACF and the Texas Chefs Association (TCA) since 1990. She has competed in numerous ACF-sanctioned competitions and won a number of medals — four gold, one silver and one bronze, as well as several medals through the TCA. Hodges joined the World Master Chefs Association in 1996 and participated on that year’s Golden Platter Banqueting Competition team as a member of its pastry team that brought home the Golden Platter from Limerick, Ireland.
 

Alsion Hodges prepares for scholarship dinner.
Alison Hodges, right, assisted with pastries.

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TCC Vice Chancellor Awarded Prestigious Real Estate Honor

TCC’s Nina Petty and City of Fort Worth’s Natalie Ayala Moore, 2017 Outstanding Leader

Nina Petty, TCC vice chancellor for Real Estate and Facilities, recently received the Susan A. Halsey Founder’s Award. Petty was recognized at the Real Estate Council’s 2017 annual meeting for her dedication and commitment “in shaping the City of Fort Worth all while promoting the mission of the Real Estate Council of Greater Fort Worth.”

Award presenter Karen Vermaire Fox described Petty as “a tremendous advocate for the community of Fort Worth, serving on multiple boards and commissions, everything from the Mayor’s Kitchen Cabinet, to Downtown Fort Worth, Inc., the Downtown Design and Review Board and the True Worth Board for the Homeless.”

Petty is a founding member of the Real Estate Council and the second chair of the organization. “She was part of a small group of women that formed the Commercial Real Estate Women’s Network over 30 years ago and has continued to serve as a staunch advocate for women working in commercial real estate,” Fox said.

Previous award winners have included former Fort Worth Mayor Bob Bolen.

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Tarrant County College TCC Connect Campus Hosts PTK International Honor Society Charter and Induction Ceremony

FORT WORTH, Texas (April 25, 2017)
WHAT:
Tarrant County College’s newest campus, TCC Connect, will induct 73 members into its newly established chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the international honor society for two-year colleges. The Beta Chi Zeta Chapter becomes the sixth TCC chapter of PTK that has recognized academic excellence since it was established in 1918.
 
Members must have a GPA of 3.5 or higher and have earned at least 12 college-level credits. Using the international criteria, TCC Connect charter members were selected from the dean’s list.
 
Incoming officers for the 2017-2018 academic year are: Bridgette Graves, president; India Picquet, vice president of fellowship; Marcia Gonzales Boyte, vice president of scholarship; and Gabrielle Marshall, vice president of recruitment and membership.
 
As the TCC campus responsible for eLearning and Weekend College, TCC Connect provides a virtual environment and flexibility for students with multiple priorities as they pursue their educational goals.
 
WHEN:
Thursday, April 27
6:30 p.m.
 
WHERE:
Connection Bay
Tarrant County College TCC Connect Campus
444 N. Henderson Street
Fort Worth, TX 76102
 
Parking:
TCC Garage at the Corner of Belknap and Cherry Streets
 

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Traveling World War I Museum Visits TCC’s Northwest Campus in Honor of War’s Centennial

Tuesday, Feb. 14 – Friday, Feb. 17
TCC Northwest Campus (4801 Marine Creek Pkwy., Fort Worth), WSTU 1305
Free

 
FORT WORTH, Texas (February 8, 2017) – As the United States marks 100 years since it entered World War I, a special exhibit is making a stop at Tarrant County College. The community is invited to visit the WWI 100th Anniversary Mobile Museum Feb. 14 through Feb. 17 at Northwest Campus. TCC is the first college to host the museum, which is in the middle of a four-year tour to commemorate World War I’s centennial (2014 to 2018).
 
The mobile museum, curated by Dallas historian Keith Colley, tells the story of the “War to End All Wars” and spotlights the life of Ernest Loucks. Loucks served in the U.S. Army and kept a variety of artifacts, many of which are part of the display. A tool used to help dig 25,000 miles of trenches dug in World War I; a movie camera on which soldiers filmed images from battle; British and American gas masks and two rare pigtail stakes that held barbed wire, used as a new form of warfare are included in the exhibition.
 
“This is a unique opportunity to gain a greater respect for our veterans who served in a conflict that truly changed the world,” said Laura Matysek Wood, Ph.D., professor of history and government. “Without any living World War I veterans, it is more important than ever to preserve and share this history.”
 
The exhibit is open to the TCC students, faculty and staff as well as the public. Admission is free. The museum will be set up in WSTU 1305. Hours are:
• Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 14 and 15, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
• Thursday, Feb. 16, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
• Friday, Feb. 17, 9:30 a.m. to noon.
 
For more information on the WWI 100th Anniversary Mobile Museum, visit ww1mobilemuseum.com. Details on the TCC exhibition are available from Laura Matysek Wood at laura.wood@tccd.edu or 817-515-7280.
 

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What’s stopping you? High school students lead college honor society

(Pictured L-R) Zachary Steele, Taylor Cattes, Kellis Ruiz

(Pictured L-R) Zachary Steele, Taylor Cattes, Kellis Ruiz

By all accounts, Taylor Cattes, Kellis Ruiz and Zachary Stemple are doing an exemplary job leading the Northwest Campus chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the international honor society for two-year colleges. As officers, they pulled off a perfect induction ceremony for new members in late November and are organizing service projects to benefit the College and the community—all while working toward their associate degrees, earning outstanding grades and planning their futures. And they’re reaching these accomplishments while they’re still in high school.
 
The Alpha Delta Delta chapter at Northwest is one of the few Phi Theta Kappa groups in the country whose officers include high school students. Cattes, Ruiz and Stemple attend Marine Creek Collegiate High School (MCCHS) on Northwest Campus—an intensive program offered in partnership with the Fort Worth Independent School District that allows students to simultaneously earn high school credit and tuition-free, transferable college credit. Students can earn up to an associate degree by the time they obtain their high school diploma.
 
“I have always held myself up to a high academic standard—a ‘school comes first’ philosophy,” said Cattes, a senior serving as Phi Theta Kappa president this year. “That’s exactly what I signed up for at MCCHS. I applied to the school because I was determined to succeed and better myself.”
 
“The opportunity to accelerate my education was very appealing,” added Ruiz, a senior and vice president of public relations. “The college-level classes are more challenging, promising and fruitful than just the high school curriculum.”
 
For Stemple, a junior and vice president of fellowship, the independence and responsibility that come with MCCHS enrollment was a big draw—as was the opportunity to save both money and time in his higher education experience. With a year of high school still to go, he will have 52 college hours at the end of the fall semester. Like Cattes and Ruiz, he is on track to earn an associate degree by the end of his senior year.
 
The trio’s desire to succeed also led them to Phi Theta Kappa. Membership is extended to elite students who have completed at least 12 hours toward an associate degree with a minimum GPA of 3.5; the organization recognizes academic achievement while building leadership skills. Phi Theta Kappa has recognized TCC’s chapters for their service-learning projects and outstanding members and advisors. Earlier this year, Alpha Delta Delta at Northwest earned Five-Star Chapter status—the highest designation a chapter can receive.
 
“Involvement in Phi Theta Kappa allows these students to develop professionally as they engage in scholarship, leadership, community service, collaboration and other areas that they will eventually have to mature in as students in higher education,” noted Ayanna Jackson-Fowler, Ph.D., professor of English and Phi Theta Kappa advisor. “The opportunities that Phi Theta Kappa gives these high school students are quite valuable as they transfer to a college or university in that they, in essence, will have a head start on developing professionally and be role models to their peers.”
 
Phi Theta Kappa membership is so valuable that the Fort Worth ISD Education Foundation funds membership fees for all MCCHS students accepted into the honor society.
“Fort Worth ISD students continue to excel and the Foundation is committed to helping those high achievers continue to the next level, especially when they have limited financial resources that may prevent them from advancing their academic goals,” said Mike West, Ed.D., board chair of the Fort Worth ISD Education Foundation.
 
At the end of spring 2016, all of Northwest’s Phi Theta Kappa officers were graduating. Briar Gorrell, who served as president of the chapter last year, encouraged the MCCHS students to take on more visible roles in the organization.
 
“They were excited and had a positive impact on every meeting,” remembered Gorrell, who is now studying nursing at TCU. “They wanted to be involved and were committed. You get back what you put into Phi Theta Kappa, and they put a lot into it.”
 
Cattes, Ruiz and Stemple went through the same application and interview process as other officer candidates. Gorrell says it was clear that the high school students were ready to take on the challenge.
 
“I was amazed by their capabilities,” said Gorrell. “When you have a student willing to do the work to get an associate degree while in high school, that says a lot.”
 
If the collegiate high school approach blurs the lines between high school and college, the MCCHS students’ leadership in Phi Theta Kappa almost erases them.
 
“The older students work very well with them and do not treat them any different based on them being younger and in high school,” remarked Jackson-Fowler. “As the older students work with these younger students as a team, there really is no distinction between the two groups.”
 
All the MCCHS Phi Theta Kappa officers say their participation is much more than a line on their résumés—they are honored to serve and are developing qualities that will benefit them in higher education and beyond. For Cattes, her role as Phi Theta Kappa president helped her overcome some nagging self-doubt.
 
“By being part of Phi Theta Kappa, I have become more confident and comfortable with myself, because I am surrounded by people who are like family to me,” she said.
 
Ruiz and Stemple have both grown as scholars since joining the organization. Stemple has acquired better time management skills that allow him to balance his studies and activities. Ruiz is learning to overcome chronic procrastination.
 
“I can only imagine the load that they have to carry as high school students taking college courses and being committed to Phi Theta Kappa,” noted Jackson-Fowler. “The diligence with which they have to achieve their many tasks has to be quite high. They are helping to form the standard for high school students that come after them into the Phi Theta Kappa community at TCC Northwest.”
 
All three plan to transfer to a four-year university after graduation from MCCHS. Cattes is interested in forensic anthropology and crime scene investigation; Ruiz wants to study anthropology and political science and earn his doctorate. Stemple plans to go into engineering.
 
Cattes, Ruiz and Stemple hope their roles as Phi Theta Kappa officers can inspire their fellow students to reach even higher.
 
“I think it reminds them that while we are still high school students, we really are college students too,” explained Stemple. “I would tell other MCCHS students not to hide on campus. Be proud of what you’ve accomplished. We can excel.”
 
Ruiz agrees. “Age doesn’t matter as much as your goals and determination.”
 
This story is the latest in a series celebrating members of the TCC community who don’t let challenges stop them. Follow these links to read previous features: Salma Alvarez, Celia Mwakutuya, Jessica Caudle, Ken Moak, Melora Werlwas and Kevin Douglas.

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Southlake Police to Honor Fallen Officers During National Police Memorial Week

The week of May 15th is set aside each year as a time to honor the men and women in law enforcement who have made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty.

As part of National Police Memorial Week, the Southlake Police Department will join law enforcement agencies all across the country in remembering the many brave souls who have laid down their lives in the service of others. The ceremony will take place at 10:00 a.m. at our DPS North Training facility at 100 East Dove.

Police Chief James Brandon says, “We will never forget our sister and brothers in blue who have died protecting the lives of the innocent. We owe them a debt of gratitude; and we salute the officers who continue to carry on the tradition of protecting and serving the citizens of Southlake and this great Nation.”

Since the first recorded police death in 1791, there have been over 20,000 law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty. The week of May 15th was established as National Police Memorial Week on October 1, 1962 by a joint resolution of the 87th Congress of the United States of America.

Law enforcement agencies will lower their flags to half-staff so that the nation may pay their respects to the men and women who died while protecting the lives of others.

God Bless our police officers and their families.

**The public is invited to attend the annual Police Officers Memorial Ceremony Thursday, May 19 at 10:00 a.m. at our DPS North training facility at 100 East Dove Road.    

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