Park Village Fountain to be Repaired

The privately owned fountain at Park Village is in need of repairs that could take several months to complete.

Representatives from ShopCore Properties, the owners of Park Village, tell the City that while the fountain had been working over the last several months, recently new issues were discovered.

“We are doing everything we can to permanently repair the fountain at Park Village, said Terrie Hatfield, Regional Property Manager at ShopCore Properties. “With each repair, there is a necessary investigatory process to define the root cause of each breakdown, which requires specialists to evaluate.  We are continuously addressing all repairs and are committed to ensuring Park Village is a best in class property.”

The fountain was previously repaired in 2017 after experiencing pipe corrosion issues.

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Relive art on the prairie at Log Cabin Village

Explore new frontiers at Log Cabin Village as interpreters demonstrate historic skills with a modern sensibility during the Up Close With A Village Artisan series.
Topics include:
March 11. Clay sculpting.
April 15. Drop spindle and wheel spinning.
May 6. Watercolors.

All sessions run from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Note that these are demonstrations, not hands-on classes. But bring lots of questions.

The Log Cabin Village is a living history museum owned and operated by the City of Fort Worth. The village, devoted to the preservation of Texas heritage, is at 2100 Log Cabin Village Lane.

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It takes a village to be prepared for disasters

September is National Preparedness Month. This year’s theme — “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You Can” — focuses on the goal to increase the number of individuals, families and communities that engage in preparedness actions at home, work, business, school and places of worship. Part 2 of a four-part series:

Comprehensive preparedness requires the whole community to participate, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency places tremendous value on communities that embrace a local Neighbors Helping Neighbors approach.

Neighbors Helping Neighbors empowers community leaders to involve and educate individuals from their community about simple steps to become more prepared.

Forty-six percent of individuals expect to rely a great deal on people in their neighborhood for assistance within the first 72 hours after a disaster. When the whole community comes together to respond to and help recover from these emergencies, we can often meet the needs of everyone.

The Neighbor Helping Neighbor approach seeks to support state and local agencies, civic organizations, faith-based groups and other community organizations that serve the whole community. FEMA works to provide these organizations with additional tools and preparedness training opportunities so they can become more prepared. This includes pointers on creating a Community Preparedness Toolkit.

KnoWhat2Do is a regional North Central Texas preparedness program that promotes Think, Prepare and Act strategies to enable your family to become prepared for any incident.

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Park Village Fountain Goes Dry for Repairs

The privately-owned fountain at Park Village is currently turned off due to water leak and pipe corrosion issues. According to the Park Village property management, Shopcore, several steps must be taken before it is in working order again.

Those steps include filling the fountain with non-corrosive City water to help determine where the leak is coming from, repairing the corroded water lines, re-plastering the inside of the fountain and finally sealing the outside masonry.  Once the fountain is operational it will continue to be run on City water to avoid the corrosion from the previous well water.

The timeline for the overhaul is still being determined.  The City will be working with Shopcore management and the fountain’s new construction contractors to monitor the complete and timely repair.

While the fountain does not represent a safety issue, parents are urged to keep their children away from the fountain until renovations are complete.

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First Look at Proposed Plans for Village at Carillon Parc

On June 28th, a meeting will take place which could make the undeveloped mixed-use component of Carillon come to life.

Next Wednesday, a development team will present their vision to the public for moving forward with a new commercial concept for Carillon, the Village at Carillon Parc, which includes a walkable retail, living and office experience integrated with parks and open spaces, and proposes a potential site for a new city library.

“The Carillon residential community is well-established on 285 acres between North White Chapel Boulevard and Carroll Avenue on State Highway 114,” said Development Manager John Terrell. “We want to complement the Villa and Estate homes with a visionary, vibrant and highly livable village experience, and we think the Village at Carillon Parc does just that.”

The meeting begins at 5:30 p.m. with an open house in the Marq Southlake’s Legends Hall Ballroom, where people can review the proposed plans and design concepts as well as ask questions. The development team will make a formal presentation at 6:00 p.m.

“Earlier this year, John and the The Village at Carillon Parc development team team met with the Southlake 2035 Corridor Committee and members of the City’s Community Enhancement and Development Corporation with an idea about the Carillon Plaza and Corporate districts,” said Southlake Mayor Laura Hill. “As you can imagine, there were a lot of questions and recommendations. The June 28th meeting is intended to be a follow-up conversation before they start the City’s development process.”

For more information about Southlake’s development process visit CityofSouthlake.com/Development.

The Village at Carillon Park rendering

 

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Park Village Welcomes Sweet Addition: Steel City Pops

Looking to satisfy your sweet tooth? Pop in to Southlake. From fruity and fresh to creamy and indulgent, Steel City Pops will soon be serving up its gourmet frozen pops in Park Village at 1151 E. Southlake Blvd., Ste. 370. The cool pop shop is expected to open in early March.

“We have actually wanted to be in Southlake for a couple years now. We have been waiting for the perfect spot and we really feel like we’ve found that! Southlake is a beautiful city with a great family-friendly vibe. We feel Southlake residents represent our loyal customer base very well,” states Ryan Childress, the general manager of Steel City Pops in Southlake.

The Southlake location will be one of 18 branches in the company-owned chain. Started by Jim Watkins and family in 2012 in Alabama, Steel City Pops has now expanded to Kentucky and Texas, with no shortage of locations in North Texas alone. Currently there are three branches each in Dallas and Fort Worth.

Dedicated to quality, Steel City Pops makes everything in small batches from fresh, natural ingredients that are certified organic and are locally-harvested where possible. All pops are sweetened with raw, organic cane sugar and are free of artificial flavors, colors and preservatives. All of the pops are gluten-free and vegetarian, and the fruity choices are even vegan-friendly.

With each branch offering a menu unique to its location, as well as seasonal flavors and Pop of the Month, there is always something new to try at Steel City Pops. The featured flavor in January was Salted Caramel Apple. A few tasty flavors found at DFW area locations include Blood Orange, Champagne White Tea, Pineapple Jalapeno, Black Sesame Seed, Chocolate with Peanut Butter, Maple Bacon with Bourbon, and Root Beer Float.

“We will be offering a discounted rate on our pops for the opening event. Be looking for information on that on our social media,” stated Childress.

For additional details about Steel City Pops, please visit their website.

Steel City Pops_Cookie Pop

This article was provided by Tracy Southers with WordPlay, LLC.

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